Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Brian.Dixon

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 133
1
Hey ... If you really want a yacht finish, save yourself some work and ONLY make it pretty on the outside of the hull from the waterline to the gunnels, and on the outside faces of the pilothouse and cuddy side panels ... nobody sees or notices anything else! 


2
<snip>
Think I will call Wayne Windows and find out, seems like you say caulk on the outside should do the trick. Liner on the upper window frames sure would save lots of work and be super clean looking. might use it on the inside of the roof also.

Let us know, but I think you're on to something ... and it'd be a LOT easier to keep it clean and simple in how it looks and how you install it.


3
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: problems with tape
« on: May 10, 2021, 05:57:01 AM »
I will ask.  Iíve never had issues before.  They say it works for the techs when they tested it.  Frustrating

Maybe they know there's an issue but don't want to admit it?  For sure, I'd look elsewhere for glass ... you're not using a new jug of hardener or resin, right?  The epoxy is ruled out?

4

I've never heard of any rot or moisture related issues with hull liner ... except on boats with unrepaired cracks and leaks that let the rain in, and even then, it's more of a mildew issue ... not wood rot or anything similar.  People that have the hull liner love it.  As for keeping the boat dry inside, including during storage, that's a good idea for ALL boats, liner or not.  I would not hesitate to use hull liner.  I wouldn't clamp a window frame onto it though.  Better to have window frames clamping the wood itself ... better seal.

  Clamping over the hull liner sure would look clean.   It wouldnít have occurred  to me that it could be a problem for the window seal.  Then again, I have no idea how the windows seal

Different manufacturers are different ... I would say that if the caulk is on the exterior face, that clamping over the hull liner on the interior should be fine, no?  Maybe it's a non-issue, but I just wouldn't want rain and spray getting past the window to the hull liner.  Probably a non-issue...




5

I've never heard of any rot or moisture related issues with hull liner ... except on boats with unrepaired cracks and leaks that let the rain in, and even then, it's more of a mildew issue ... not wood rot or anything similar.  People that have the hull liner love it.  As for keeping the boat dry inside, including during storage, that's a good idea for ALL boats, liner or not.  I would not hesitate to use hull liner.  I wouldn't clamp a window frame onto it though.  Better to have window frames clamping the wood itself ... better seal.

6
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: problems with tape
« on: May 09, 2021, 01:02:34 PM »

I wonder if there's anything like a S/N that you could communicate to the actual manufacturer ... and ask them questions about what wetting agent they used and whether it's compatible with all epoxy products?


7

CONGRATULATIONS on hitting this major milestone!  Looking awesome!  And BIG!!


8

... A lot of woods have silica and aromatics in them that aren't good for lungs.  People think of wood dust as being harmless, but a lot of it isn't... Need at least a dust mask.


9
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: problems with tape
« on: May 08, 2021, 07:48:23 AM »

... My gut feel is that you got a batch of glass that had something wrong with the wetting agent that they applied to it ('sizing', Silane typ.) ...


10

Did you have to order your Ipe?  I've never actually seen the stuff ...


11

Not sure how to type it without turning into a real link, so a pic is attached.  Note where the actual url is and where the link name/text is:

Defending the Republic!



12
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: problems with tape
« on: May 07, 2021, 02:31:37 PM »
I can see it, try wetting out some other glass you have just to eliminate the epoxy.

Good idea.  Also, where/how was the glass stored?  Dampness, especially combined with dust, can make glass resist wetting out properly.  Most glass, nowadays, is sized with Silane and Silane works with both epoxy and polyester resins... unlike the bad ol' days when you really had to double-check that you were buying E-glass...


15
I too used Raptor on my back deck. I like how tuff it is. The soft sand is fairly tuff as well. The thing I love about soft sand is how it removes any slip on the deck. Bedliner can still be slippery when wet. I found on our last trip that stepping from soft sand to deck without soft sand was a little slippery when wet. Cool thing about bedliner is if later you decide to soft sand it with paint it is paintable.

Reminds me of the time a friend washed out the inside of his boat with soapy dish soap water and didn't rinse well enough ... a few hours later in big seas and a constant drizzle, nobody in the boat could stay standing up.  Lots of bashed shins, 4-letter words, bruises, and a busted fishing rod ... guess who got grilled on how well the boat WAS rinsed out before every trip after that?




Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 133