Author Topic: From So California  (Read 334 times)

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tule peak timber

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From So California
« on: January 25, 2023, 04:59:46 PM »
Howdy, my name is Rob and I just got my set of plans for a GA. Lots to figure out as I plan to build the boat here in So. Cal and take it to Kodiak AK where it will remain permanently. I am not new to boating or woodworking, I'm just trying to figure out how to pull it all together before I start. Doing a LOT of reading and asking a LOT of questions. Some awfully nice craft being displayed on this site.
Cheers and Howdy!
PS: I have a small lumber yard here in So Cal and I might be able to help out local guys with this and that.
Rob

Brian.Dixon

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Re: From So California
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2023, 05:32:26 PM »

Thanks, Rob and welcome aboard!

The Great Alaskan - Professional performance - Easy to build! - https://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

tule peak timber

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Re: From So California
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2023, 04:50:49 PM »
So, approaching this from a bassackwards start; I've been contacting aluminum trailer manufacturers in the LA area and they don't even bother to return paperwork or quotes! I did speak with a very nice insurance woman in Oregon today and she explained that I will need to seek insurance eventually in my state of residency, even though I want to use the boat in another state. And finally; I've yet to decide what model. The reason I am building is because of the design, fuel efficiency and cost. I will be trailering the boat a lot in AK and sometimes launching off of cobblestone, unimproved launch ramps. My wife and don't really need a lot of luxury or creature comforts, but sea keeping ability is a must and some speed would be nice. Yes, we will overnight but it will not need to be luxurious. My wife has expressed a desire to trailer the boat on the AK ferry system and explore all over AK and the Aleutians.
I would love to hear comments from owners or Brian on the pros and cons of the narrow model vs. the Kodiak.

Brian.Dixon

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Re: From So California
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2023, 07:26:59 AM »

If I were to build one for my wife and I, it'd be a 27 foot standard Great Alaska ... a real sweet spot in terms of performance.  The Kodiak is designed for 'serious recreational or light commercial usage', which means there is an expectation that the cockpit area will be loaded heavier with people, gear, outriggers, ice, fish bins etc.  In other words, the Kodiak is a stern-duty boat and will trim best when used in this manner.  That said, a shorter Kodiak, say 27-foot, will trim properly (at rest) with a lighter, e.g. normal recreational, load versus the longer 28-30 foot Kodiak lengths.  If you really want a lighter-load Kodiak in the 28-30 foot range, you can have it ... just plan on keeping weight towards the stern (batteries, aft belly tank etc), and consider putting the motor(s) on an 8 to 12 inch bracket etc.  Hope this helps.

Brian
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tule peak timber

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Re: From So California
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2023, 10:14:07 AM »
Your response says a lot! We are big black cod fans, so we definitely will have a puller for deep water set lines, as well as crab and shrimp pots. Not commercial any longer, but I still like to go get them. LOL
Planning ahead, maybe a fish box in the stern that will carry some ballast water, then displaced with fish later. My wife wants to collect driftwood for use in my business. Some food for thought. Thank you for your response!

Brian.Dixon

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Re: From So California
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2023, 09:31:42 AM »
Your response says a lot! We are big black cod fans, so we definitely will have a puller for deep water set lines, as well as crab and shrimp pots. Not commercial any longer, but I still like to go get them. LOL
Planning ahead, maybe a fish box in the stern that will carry some ballast water, then displaced with fish later. My wife wants to collect driftwood for use in my business. Some food for thought. Thank you for your response!

Batteries fit under splash wells, and motor brackets (while not cheap) can move the weight of the motor(s) aft if you need to.  What I recommend, if there's any question about it, is to build the basic shell ... hull, pilot house (sides, bulkhead, roof, windows), and cuddy (bunks, sides, roof) ... then launch the boat at a dock and use sand bags to emulate the weights of heavier items such as the center point of fuel or water tanks, batteries, and the motor (I can help calculate the pounds of sand to emulate motors on brackets).  Once the trim is tuned to give 1-1/2 to 2 inches bow-up trim, pull the boat out and go finish it!

Brian

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tule peak timber

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Re: From So California
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2023, 10:04:57 AM »
Smart! We are located on a mountain top in basically the desert. What we could do is get it set up on a trailer and go to a nearby lake, launch, and do the sandbag technique.
Right now I am looking at where I might set up the building jig, near the front of my shop, with a temporary cover to keep the sun off. The jig would not be moveable, but I would have plenty of elbow room in building the basic hull. I've got some big forklifts that we could rig to somehow parbuckle the hull to turn it. Then we might go to the future trailer. I know somewhere you recommended you should not put the boat hull immediately onto a trailer? With it on a trailer, I can roll it in and out of my shop without clogging up my work flow.

Brian.Dixon

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Re: From So California
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2023, 03:26:40 PM »

The main reason for not putting it on a trailer too soon is access ... an extra 2' to climb each time in/out of the boat.  Of course, the splashwell can go in last, so you can climb in/out through the motor cut-out.  Kind of a best compromise ...

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