Author Topic: 28 GA in Pagosa Springs colorado  (Read 19013 times)

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Brian.Dixon

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Re: 28 GA in Pagosa Springs colorado
« Reply #405 on: September 06, 2020, 09:20:08 AM »
This discussion is inspiring. One big goal with this boat is to do the inside passage to Glacier Bay when it's done. I'm making a lot of design notes that will help me do that. Is there a thread out there that talks specifically about long haul cruising or favorite anchorages? I hope when you go you're able to post pictures of your trip. I spent a week at Port Harry a couple years ago and it was amazing.

I know that Dan Boccia's boat was built for longer trips and he did a thorough and bristol job on his ... but there are others who built with the same intent.  A link to his main build thread is below.  Also try searching the forum on related topics such as 'head' or 'refrigerator' or 'stove' or 'heater' etc.  Regardless of anything, boat camping and exploring SE Alaska is exactly what this boat was designed for ... room for a head and appliances, queen-size bed up front, seaworthy, and goes a long way on a gallon of gas...

Dan Boccia's build thread

Brian
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Djeffrey

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Re: 28 GA in Pagosa Springs colorado
« Reply #406 on: September 06, 2020, 10:20:45 AM »
After spending a week on the boat I agree that this boat was built for just that. I have found that this forum is great for boat building but cruising the inside passage is an animal all by itself. There are many books,video, and forums just on this subject. Anchorages, tides, weather, saftey, fuel are just a few things you need to understand before heading out.

Brian.Dixon

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Re: 28 GA in Pagosa Springs colorado
« Reply #407 on: September 06, 2020, 06:58:45 PM »
 ;D 8) Thanks for the kind words!  As far as I know, it's the only stitch-n-glue boat in its class.  There are some framed boats in this size range (Gerr), and slow boats (Devlin), but no fast and big boats like this one... :)

The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! - https://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

rhenryinoregon

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Re: 28 GA in Pagosa Springs colorado
« Reply #408 on: September 06, 2020, 09:37:36 PM »
After spending a week on the boat I agree that this boat was built for just that. I have found that this forum is great for boat building but cruising the inside passage is an animal all by itself. There are many books,video, and forums just on this subject. Anchorages, tides, weather, saftey, fuel are just a few things you need to understand before heading out.

Yup, Im reading some books and watching videos. I got  my masters license This last winter and figure I have several years to bone up on things. I dont intend to do the passage until Im good and ready.

Dan Boccia

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Re: 28 GA in Pagosa Springs colorado
« Reply #409 on: September 21, 2020, 01:04:47 AM »
Rheny, one of the major factors of longer-range cruising is range, and therefore both building as light as possible and putting in as much fuel storage as possible. If you want to maximize fuel storage, you really need tanks custom-fit to your hull between the stringers. I wish I had put a little more effort into making my forward tank bigger with a customized front end to the tank - even 5 or 10 gallons makes a difference. So that's one consideration.

Another consideration is building light - to do that I used only okoume, which is quite a bit lighter than other marine plywoods (and nice to work with), and my cabin is mostly made with foam rather than plywood, which has its advantages and disadvantages, but is about 40% lighter than okoume.

I stuck to the glass schedule that Brian specifies, and avoided overbuilding by putting on "extra glass". Extra glass is just not needed, I think Brian's design is proven enough at this point. Extra glass, and therefore extra resin, sneaks up on you in the weight department.

We have arrived at the moment in which lithium marine batteries are widely available and (barely) affordable. I could shed 50 lb off my boat simply by replacing the batteries, and at the same time have more battery capacity and faster recharge times.

One place where I splurged and added weight is by installing an anchor winch. The good thing is this weight is way up on the nose, which is good because it counters all the engine weight on the stern. The winch is the cat's meow of anchor retrieval systems - way less fussy than a windlass, takes up way less space than a windlass (no chain locker needed), you can easily have 600 ft of rode by using 1/4" dyneema backer, and is fast, powerful, and super convenient. Putting the hook out for lunch or whatever is so simple now I do it way more frequently and as a result have a lot more relaxed, enjoyable downtime, which is the whole point of cruising anyway, mostly.

The planning and dreaming stage is super fun - enjoy it!