Author Topic: Shower sump discharge  (Read 860 times)

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Todd j

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Shower sump discharge
« on: October 22, 2020, 06:35:26 AM »
What are most folks using as thru hull type fittings and locations?   My biggest concern is #1 maintaining the least amount of lift for the pump, #2 not scrubbing off the clamshell fitting on docks or trailering.  Im using the new rule sump
« Last Edit: October 22, 2020, 06:36:01 AM by Todd j »

Djeffrey

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2020, 06:30:41 PM »
I used a simple plastic 3/4 discharge. I put it up to high, I would bring it down maybe to 8-12 inches above the waterline.

json

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2020, 09:38:01 AM »
I am not sure if it helps or not but the only thing for now that I am going to have for an above water thru-hull besides fuel fittings is going to be the discharge from my bait tank, which I am going to route through the transom with just a hole, no fitting. I plan to make it expandable to be able to hopefully connect anything else I want to route overboard into it.

Todd j

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2020, 11:28:01 AM »
Makes sense.  The shower sump has a check valve right at the sump outlet.  So, anything downstream of it to the thruhull is trapped in the line, so short runs with minimal rise are what Im after

Djeffrey

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2020, 01:25:20 PM »
I found that the one way check valve didnt work for poop. So I am trying to put a second one in that works better.

Grady300

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2020, 04:34:22 PM »
Forgive me for maybe not knowing about a change but my last 2 factory built boats had showers and they drained overboard or into the bilge. Does sink and fairly clean grey water now need to go into a holding tank? unless your off shore of course. Just spent a little north of 2k for my toilet and waist management system for black water.
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Todd j

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2020, 07:36:43 PM »
The sump with discharge just keeps it out of the bilge.  I intend to put a y branch in my sink drain to a bucket or
Something incase the pump fails

Todd j

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2020, 07:40:58 PM »
Djeffrey maybe a swing check right at the thruhull or as near as possible.  Any water that doesnt get pumped out may as well end up back in the box instead of being trapped in tube between the hull and box.  At least there you can sponge it out.  If your run is too long and it drains back of course the pump will never empty the box

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2020, 07:46:12 AM »
Forgive me for maybe not knowing about a change but my last 2 factory built boats had showers and they drained overboard or into the bilge. Does sink and fairly clean grey water now need to go into a holding tank? unless your off shore of course. Just spent a little north of 2k for my toilet and waist management system for black water.

For boats less than 65 feet, you can discharge gray water overboard if you are a) 3 miles offshore or further, and b) not in a no-discharge zone (sensitive areas). 

At home, if it's not an installed system in a dwelling unit, I believe it's OK to discharge gray water right on the ground.  If the gray water system is installed in a dwelling unit, then it's gotta go in the sewer or septic system.

MOSTLY, I see boat's draining gray water all the way down the highway on the way home... :D

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« Last Edit: October 25, 2020, 07:46:47 AM by Brian.Dixon »
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Todd j

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2020, 11:14:28 AM »
when discharging grey water my less than perfect recollection requires the use of phosphates free soap.  I dont know if this helps anyone

WCR247

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2020, 04:02:29 AM »
Current and from the EPA site. https://www.epa.gov/vessels-marinas-and-ports/vessel-sewage-frequently-asked-questions

What are the sewage discharge regulations/requirements in the United States?

Section 312 of the Clean Water Act requires the use of operable, U.S. Coast Guard-certified marine sanitation devices (MSDs) onboard vessels that are equipped with installed toilets and operating on U.S. navigable waters.
Untreated sewage discharges are prohibited within three miles from shore.
In order to discharge within three miles, sewage must be treated using a U.S. Coast Guard-approved Type I or Type II MSD. Alternatively, sewage may be stored onboard in a holding tank (Type III MSD).
Treated and untreated sewage discharges are prohibited in:
Freshwater lakes, reservoirs and other freshwater impoundments whole inlets or outlets are such as to prevent the ingress or egress by vessel traffic.
Rivers not capable of navigation by interstate vessel traffic.
No-discharge zones (NDZs) (as applicable).
In these areas, sewage effluent generally must be retained onboard in a holding tank (Type III MSD). Operators of vessels equipped with flow-through MSDs (Type I or Type II) must secure the device to prevent overboard discharge.
Visit the No-Discharge Zones (NDZs) by State webpage for more information on the location and applicability of NDZs.
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Can I discharge graywater from my vessel?

Graywater is regulated differently depending on the type of vessel and whether it is mixed with sewage effluent. Commercial and military vessels have graywater requirements under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permitting regime and the Uniform National Discharge Standards, respectively. For recreational vessels, there are currently no federal rules in place regulating graywater.

For all vessels, when graywater and sewage are mixed, the resulting discharge must meet sewage effluent requirements.
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Brian.Dixon

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Re: Shower sump discharge
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2020, 08:20:57 AM »
Good info on black water (sewage).

This link contains a summary of both black and gray water disposal ... focus on the purely gray water (no black water mixed with it) and the rules are pretty simple:

  https://www.boatus.org/study-guide/environment/waste/

Brian

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